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Health | March 30, 2016

Are we really changing the world? A look at Georgia’s key role in changing the world.

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A new report from CNBC names Georgia-based global health nonprofit MAP International number two among the “Top 10 Charities Changing the World in 2015.” Among the top 10 charities included on CNBC’s list, MAP has a score of 99.92, based on financial health, accountability and transparency of reporting. We had to stop for a moment of reflection with such a distinguished title and think on what exactly what are we doing to change the world?

At MAP, it’s our mission to provide medical aid to the world’s poor.  We do this through thousands of field partners serving in the world’s poorest countries, but we’re not alone in this world changing endeavor.

The great state of Georgia is increasingly becoming an international global health hub.  A large number of the world’s leading health organizations are literally at your backdoor.  MAP has been based in Georgia for over 30 years, providing medical aid to over 10 million children and families each year in over 100 countries.   MedShare, based just outside of Atlanta, has been impacting clinics and hospitals around the world with medical equipment since 1998. 

Since 1995, the CDC Foundation has provided more than $620 million to support CDC’s work, launched 800 programs around the world and built a network of individuals and organizations committed to supporting CDC and public health.  The Carter Center has been in Atlanta since 1982 and led a coalition that has reduced the cases of Guinea worm around the globe from 3.5 million in 1986 to 126 cases today.  The Task Force for Global Health has also been based in Georgia for 30 years has saved countless lives through global vaccinations.

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In 2015, Georgian’s played a key role in stopping the Ebola outbreak in West Africa – saving countless lives of not only those infected but the healthcare professionals working to stop the virus as well.  You aided millions of people in Nepal devastated by the earthquake and even treated and prevented over seven Neglected Tropical Diseases on every continent.

We met Erica in August in Cote d’Ivoire, she’s just a frail little six year old.  She’s spent most of 2015 suffering from Buruli ulcer, a Neglected Tropical Disease that MAP International works to treat and prevent in West Africa.  Without treatment and training from NGOs based right here in Georgia, this little girl would have been deformed for the rest of her life, instead she only has a small scar and is now a healthy little girl that dreams of one day being a doctor.

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You have literally been a part of saving tens of thousands of lives around the world.  We’ve seen firsthand the role Georgian’s play in Global Health and we are thankful to call Georgia home.

So this Holiday season, consider joining with one of these world changing NGOs right here in Georgia and become a part of something bigger – something life changing.

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