Dale Hanson Bourke

Recent Posts by Dale Hanson Bourke:

MAP’s Mission Is Personal to Board Member

For MAP International board member Abidemi Oseni-Oyebode (“Abi”), the organization’s mission is personal. The daughter of a Nigerian diplomat, Abi has lived in a number of countries, and knows that access to quality medicine is something we take for granted in the US.

Topics: board of directors pharmacist

MAP’s Chagas Program Gets High Marks

Chagas disease is common in places where you find the triatomine bug, often called the “kissing bug” or the “blood sucking bug” that transmits a parasite. It is mostly found in South America, Central America, and Mexico and infects as many as 8 million people. The disease can cause swelling and fever, and without treatment can be long lasting. Left untreated, it can cause congestive heart failure.

Topics: Bolivia chagas disease

MAP Disaster Health Kits: Comfort in times of disaster

Celestina was sound asleep when the winds began to shake her simple home. Within minutes, the water rushed in and she realized that she and her baby were in grave danger.

What Celestina didn’t know was that she was in the middle of Cyclone Idai, one of the most powerful and deadly storms to ever hit Africa last March.

Living in rural Mozambique, she had no warning system and no way to prepare for the winds that reached 175 mph and floods that would displace more than 1.85 million people and claim more than a thousand lives.

All Celestina (shown below) knew--as she grabbed her two-year-old son, Manual--was that she needed help.

Topics: disaster relief hurricane dorian bahamas

Meeting the World’s Needs Close to Home

Clarkston, Georgia is often referred to as "the most diverse square mile in America" and "the Ellis Island of the South." With one of the highest refugee populations in America, it also has one of the highest uninsured rates and one of the lowest rates of access to health clinics. Ironically, it is less than 20 miles from Atlanta, one of the world centers of medical care and innovation.

Topics: georgia domestic medicine program

How does MAP choose which medicines to provide to those in need?

Have you ever wondered how MAP chooses which medicines to provide those in need?  

Great question! 

Although there are thousands of medicines available, the World Health Organization estimates that just 40 essential medicines can treat 90 percent of the illnesses in the world.

Topics: Medicines

Showing Love with Medicine Worldwide

MAP International's mission of providing medicines and health supplies to people in need extends to all corners of the globe.

We recently received this story from a US mission team who believed they were traveling to the Dominican Republic to help with construction and Vacation Bible School. They ended up performing these duties and extending grace in ways they never imagined:

People began to line up just as the sun was rising. By 8 am, the line circled the entire block with the small church in the center.

Topics: Medicines Dominican Republic matching gift

Antibiotics For A Special Child

To Albertina and her husband, every child is a gift from God. So even though her seven children were almost grown, she was thrilled to discover she was pregnant again.

And when her son was born with cerebral palsy and other disabilities, she continued to celebrate his birth, even though her family lives in a poor barrio outside Guatemala City.

“He’s my baby and I love him so much,” she says, as she kisses Froilan’s cheek. A teenager now, her son is never considered a burden, even though Albertina must carry him or push him in a makeshift wheelchair.

Topics: Dominican Republic Medicine for the World antibiotics Pediatric Antibiotics

Stopping seizures, saving lives

Today, in recognition of World Autism Awareness Day, MAP International joins in support of children around the world who have autism and their families who provide special care for them.

For families living in poverty, caring for a disabled child can be difficult if not impossible. Without the necessary therapies, equipment or medicines, families are easily overwhelmed. And many developing countries provide little or no government support.

Sadly, unable to care for their disabled children, some families simply abandon them. In the Dominican Republic, some families leave their children at Casa de Luz (“House of Light”), a private facility that cares for children with a variety of disabilities.

Topics: Medicine for the World

Bringing Hope to Our Neighbors

During her worst times, the days were long and the nights seemed endless for Marcia Emerson.

Marcia was living out of her car in Atlanta, Ga., homeless, lonely and in need of medical assistance. She was unable to afford her diabetes medication, which made her anxious and contributed to her depression.

Fortunately, Marcia (pictured right) found a place she could go to get help. The Good Samaritan Health Center was a refuge in Marcia’s darkest times. The community health center, located on the west side of Atlanta, offers free medications, physician’s visits  and  a hot meal.

“When folks come here, they are treated like real people. We’re not just put on the back burner,” she says. “We’re treated like Christ would’ve treated us.”

People like Marcia are why MAP launched its Domestic Medicine Program (DMP). This partnership with the Good Samaritan Health Center and other charitable clinics in the state of Georgia provides medicines at no cost to uninsured and underinsured citizens who have fallen through the cracks of the healthcare system.

Topics: newsletter domestic medicine program atlanta

How Magdelena Came to Shine

“It started with a small sore on my face,” remembers Magdalena. “But soon my entire face was swollen and deformed.”

Magdalena lives in rural Haiti, far away from a clinic. So she suffered as inflammation on her face spread and her pain became almost unbearable. “It was very painful,” she says, “but I was also ashamed because I looked so ugly. No one wanted to look at me.

“I had terrible headaches and I couldn’t sleep because of the pain. Because of that I couldn’t work or care for my family. I thought I would die and I worried what would happen to my children.”

Topics: Haiti life-changing medicines newsletter

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